How to Knit in the Round Using Magic Loop

I knit all of my socks using magic loop - it's so much easier than DPNs.

Knitting in the round used to fill me with dread.

Double-pointed needles felt too fussy and I would always end up with ladders.

Using circular needles was fine, but it seemed ridiculous that I had to buy the same needle size in multiple lengths to suit the project I am working on.

Sound familiar? Let me introduce you to the magic loop.

Knit in the Round Without Ladders

When I say that magic loop radically changed my opinion on knitting in the round, I am not exaggerating. Gone are the ladders. Gone are the excessive number of needles. Instead, I have a set of long circular needles that can be used on any project I wish - perfect!

This technique is perfect for hats, socks and sleeves - anything that you would usually knit in the round. I have also used it to create the trims on split hem t-shirt I am releasing soon so that the edges of the split are super neat.

In this knitting tutorial, I will teach you:

  • How to join your work in the round
  • How to knit in the round using magic loop

Magic Loop Tutorial

Written Instructions on How to Knit in the Round Using Magic Loop

  1. Cast on the required number of stitches. (In my example, I used 40 stitches)
  2. Move all of the stitches down onto the flexible cord and find the centre point of your stitches. Bend the cord at this point and gently pull a loop out between those central stitches.
  3. Continue to pull the cord through each set of stitches until they are off the cord and back on the needles. (In my example, I had 20 stitches on each needle)
  4. The cast ons should be edge to edge on the needles, with the tail end hanging down and the yarn end over the back needle.
  5. Pull out the back needle, moving the back stitches onto the cord. Using the back needle, knit into the first stitch - this will create a loop of cord on both sides of your work. Continue to knit across the row.
  6. Turn your work. What was once the back needle is now the front, and the front needle is now the back. Thread the front stitches off the cord and back onto the needle.
  7. Pull out the back needle, moving the back stitches onto the cord. Using the back needle, knit into the first stitch - this will create a loop of cord on both sides of your work. Continue to knit across the row.
  8. You have now knitted one round! Continue working steps 6 and 7 until the tube is as long as you want it.

Now it's Your turn

Magic loop sounds hard until you try it. Why don't you grab your longest pair of circulars and try it for yourself? It feels fiddly at first, but it soon becomes magic!

P.S. Thank you SO much to those of you who filled out my survey last week! I was amazed by the response it got - it gave me a much clearer understanding of the types of things I can put on the blog. There are lots of great things ahead here at Sister Mountain and I am so glad you are part of it.

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